Gonzalez & Waddington – Attorneys at Law

CALL NOW 1-800-921-8607

Article 134 UCMJ Pandering

Note: This law applies only to Article 134 UCMJ Pandering offenses allegedly committed on or after 1 January 2019.

What is Article 134 UCMJ Pandering by Inducing, Enticing, or Procuring Act of Prostitution?

Article 134 UCMJ Pandering Receiving Compensation for Arranging for Sexual Act military defense attorneysArticle 134 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) is a general provision that addresses offenses not specifically mentioned elsewhere in the UCMJ.

There are two types of Pandering under Article 134 UMCJ:

  1. Article 134 UMCJ Pandering by Arranging or Receiving Compensation for Arranging for Sexual Act
  2. Article 134 UCMJ Pandering by Inducing, Enticing, or Procuring Act of Prostitution

One of the serious offenses covered under this article is Pandering by Inducing, Enticing, or Procuring an Act of Prostitution. This offense focuses on the act of persuading, encouraging, or procuring another individual to engage in prostitution.

Article 134 UCMJ Pandering is a Serious Offense

In military law, pandering is deemed detrimental to the discipline and good order of the armed forces. An accusation under Article 134 for pandering can carry significant consequences, including confinement, dishonorable discharge, forfeiture of pay, and other punitive actions. The gravity of the repercussions underscores the need for a strong defense strategy when facing such charges.

Accusations under Article 134 UCMJ Pandering can arise from a variety of scenarios, including service members allegedly influencing another person, either through coercion or enticement, to engage in prostitution. The prosecution must prove beyond a reasonable doubt both the act of pandering and its detrimental effect on the order and discipline of the military.

Court Martial Lawyers for Article 134 UCMJ Pandering 

If you or a loved one is accused under Article 134 UCMJ Pandering, having a knowledgeable and experienced military defense lawyer by your side is crucial. Navigating the complexities of military law and the UCMJ requires an in-depth understanding of legal procedures and the ability to craft an effective defense.

At Gonzalez & Waddington, we understand the serious nature of such charges and the profound impact they can have on your military career and personal life. Our team is dedicated to providing vigorous representation to protect your rights. We work tirelessly to challenge the evidence, cross-examine witnesses, and dissect the prosecution’s case to achieve the best possible outcome for our clients.

Do not face these serious charges alone. Contact Gonzalez & Waddington today for a confidential consultation, and let us guide you through this difficult time with the dedicated legal defense you deserve.

What are the Elements of Article 134 UCMJ Pandering by Inducing, Enticing, or Procuring Act of Prostitution?

  1. That (state the time and place alleged), the accused induced, enticed, or procured (state the name of the person alleged) to engage in (a sexual act) (sexual acts) for hire and reward with (a) person(s) to be directed to (state the name of the person alleged) by the accused;
  2. That this inducing, enticing, or procuring by the accused was wrongful; and
  3. That, under the circumstances, the conduct of the accused was (to the prejudice of good order and discipline in the armed forces) (of a nature to bring discredit upon the armed forces) (to the prejudice of good order and discipline in the armed forces or of a nature to bring discredit upon the armed forces).

What are the Elements of Article 134 UCMJ Pandering by Arranging or Receiving Compensation for Arranging for Sexual Act?

  1. That (state the time and place alleged), the accused arranged for or received valuable consideration for arranging for (state the name of the alleged prostitute) to engage in (a sexual act) (sexual acts) with _______;
  2. That the arranging (and receipt of consideration) was wrongful; and
  3. That, under the circumstances, the conduct of the accused was (to the prejudice of good order and discipline in the armed forces) (of a nature to bring discredit upon the armed forces) (to the prejudice of good order and discipline in the armed forces or of a nature to bring discredit upon the armed forces).

What are the Maximum Punishments for Article 134 UCMJ Pandering?

Maximum Punishment for Article 134 UCMJ Pandering committed between 1 Jan 2019 to 27 Dec 2023:

  • 5 Years of Confinement
  • Dishonorable Discharge, BCD, Dismissal
  • Total Forfeitures
  • Reduction to E-1
  • Collateral Consequences of a Federal Felony Conviction

Maximum Punishment for Article 134 UCMJ Pandering committed after 27 Dec 2023

  • Under the Sentencing Parameters, Article 134 UCMJ Pandering is a Category 2 Offense – Confinement from 1-36 months (1 month to 3 years)
  • Dishonorable Discharge, BCD, Dismissal
  • Total Forfeitures
  • Reduction to E-1
  • Collateral Consequences of a Federal Felony Conviction
  • Note: The Military Judge MAY impose a period of confinement less than the jurisdictional maximum period of confinement upon finding specific facts that warrant such a sentence.

Combined UCMJ Maximum Punishment Charts

Sample Specifications for Article 134 UCMJ Pandering by Inducing, Enticing, or Procuring Act of Prostitution

Article 134 UCMJ Pandering Receiving Compensation for Arranging for Sexual Act military defense lawyers

In that LT Jared McConnell, US Navy did, at Pensacola, Florida on, on or about 27 November 2025, wrongfully induce Jasmine Keller to engage in sexual acts, to wit: anal sex, for hire and reward with persons to be directed to him by the said Jasmine Keller, and that such conduct was of a nature to the prejudice of good order and discipline in the armed forces and of a nature to bring discredit upon the armed forces.

Model Specifications for Article 134 UCMJ Pandering by Inducing, Enticing, or Procuring Act of Prostitution

In that __________ (personal jurisdiction data), did, (at/on board—location), on or about __________, wrongfully (induce) (entice) (procure) __________ to engage in (a sexual act) (sexual acts), to wit: ___________, for hire and reward with persons to be directed to (him) (her) by the said ______________, and that such conduct was (to the prejudice of good order and discipline in the armed forces) (of a nature to bring discredit upon the armed forces) (to the prejudice of good order and discipline in the armed forces and of a nature to bring discredit upon the armed forces).

Sample Specifications for Article 134 UCMJ Pandering by Arranging or Receiving Compensation for Arranging for Sexual Act

In that SSG Dillan Sullivan, US Army, did, Naha, Okinawa, Japan, on or about 12 May 2025, wrongfully receive valuable consideration, to wit: $5,000 on account of arranging for Camila Huggins to engage in sexual acts, to wit: oral and vaginal sex, with Admiral Roger Cleary, and that such conduct was to the prejudice of good order and discipline in the armed forces and of a nature to bring discredit upon the armed forces.

Model Specifications for Article 134 UCMJ Pandering by Arranging or Receiving Compensation for Arranging for Sexual Act

In that __________ (personal jurisdiction data), did, (at/on board—location), on or about __________, wrongfully (arrange for) (receive valuable consideration, to wit: __________ on account of arranging for) __________ to engage in (a sexual act) (sexual acts), to wit: __________, with __________, and that such conduct was (to the prejudice of good order and discipline in the armed forces) (of a nature to bring discredit upon the armed forces) (to the prejudice of good order and discipline in the armed forces and of a nature to bring discredit upon the armed forces).

What are the Definitions for Article 134 UCMJ Pandering?

“Sexual act” under Article 134 UCMJ Pandering means:

  1. the penetration, however slight, of the penis into the vulva or anus or mouth;
  2. contact between the mouth and the penis, vulva, scrotum, or anus; or
  3. the penetration, however slight, of the vulva or penis or anus of another by any part of the body or any object, with an intent to abuse, humiliate, harass, or degrade any person or to arouse or gratify the sexual desire of any person.

“For hire and reward” under Article 134 UCMJ Pandering means for receiving money or other compensation.

“Conduct prejudicial to good order and discipline” under Article 134 UCMJ Pandering is conduct which causes a reasonably direct and obvious injury to good order and discipline.)

“Service discrediting conduct” under Article 134 UCMJ Pandering is conduct which tends to harm the reputation of the service or lower it in public esteem.)

Article 134 UCMJ Pandering requires three persons

Pandering requires three persons. If only two are involved, the evidence may raise the offense of solicitation to commit prostitution. US v. Miller, 47 MJ 352 (CAAF 1997).

Article 134 UCMJ Pandering does not preempt any other lawful regulations or orders issued by a proper authority that proscribe other forms of sexual conduct for compensation by military personnel. Violations of such regulations or orders may be punishable under Article 92.

Overview of the Types of Article Article 134 UCMJ Pandering

Article 134 UCMJ: Pandering by Inducing, Enticing, or Procuring Act of Prostitution

Article 134 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) is a comprehensive provision that addresses a wide range of offenses not explicitly detailed elsewhere in the UCMJ. It aims to uphold good order and discipline within the armed forces and protect the military’s reputation. One specific offense under this article is pandering by inducing, enticing, or procuring an act of prostitution.

Interpretation of Article 134 UCMJ Pandering 

Pandering, in the context of Article 134, involves encouraging, persuading, or facilitating another person to engage in prostitution. This can include a range of actions, such as coercing someone into prostitution, enticing them with promises or incentives, or arranging and managing the logistics of the prostitution act. The core element is that the individual must actively participate in the process of inducing, enticing, or procuring the act of prostitution.

Basics of Article 134 UCMJ Pandering 

To secure a conviction for pandering under Article 134, the prosecution must prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the accused engaged in conduct that meets the following criteria:

  1. Inducing, Enticing, or Procuring: The accused must have engaged in behavior aimed at causing another person to commit an act of prostitution. This includes persuasion, coercion, or arranging the act.
  2. Knowledge and Intent: The accused must have knowingly and intentionally engaged in these actions, understanding that they were facilitating prostitution.
  3. Prejudicial to Good Order and Discipline or Service-Discrediting: The conduct must be shown to negatively impact good order and discipline within the military or discredit the armed forces.

Impact on Military Discipline and Morale of Article 134 UCMJ Pandering 

Pandering is considered a serious offense within the military due to its potential to undermine the armed forces’ integrity, discipline, and morale. Engaging in or facilitating prostitution can lead to numerous detrimental effects, including the spread of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), exposure to blackmail or extortion, and entanglement in criminal activities such as human trafficking. These risks can severely compromise the operational readiness and security of military units.

Moreover, such conduct can damage the military’s reputation, both within the United States and internationally. The involvement of military personnel in prostitution-related activities can lead to negative public perception and strained diplomatic relations, particularly in foreign countries where U.S. forces are stationed. This undermines the trust and respect necessary for effective military operations and international cooperation.

Consequences of Article 134 UCMJ Pandering

The penalties for a conviction under Article 134 for pandering can vary widely, depending on the specifics of the offense and the service member’s prior record. Potential punishments include reprimand, forfeiture of pay, reduction in rank, confinement, and dishonorable discharge. The severity of the punishment reflects the military’s commitment to maintaining high standards of conduct and deterring behavior that could harm the institution’s integrity.

Court Martial Lawyers for Article 134 UCMJ Pandering

Article 134 UCMJ’s provision on pandering by inducing, enticing, or procuring an act of prostitution underscores the military’s dedication to maintaining ethical behavior and discipline among its members. By addressing and penalizing such conduct, the military seeks to preserve its values and ensure that the actions of its personnel do not compromise the mission, morale, or reputation of the armed forces. Service members are expected to adhere to these standards, recognizing the broader implications of their conduct on their units and the military.

Examples of conduct that could constitute a violation of Article 134 UCMJ Pandering (Receiving Compensation for Arranging for Sexual Acts):

  1. Arranging Escorts for Fellow Service Members: Facilitating meetings between escorts and service members and receiving a portion of the payment.
  2. Operating a Brothel: Running a brothel and profiting from the fees paid by service members for sexual services.
  3. Using Online Platforms: Setting up online ads for escorts and arranging meetings in exchange for a commission.
  4. Acting as a Middleman: Connecting service members with local prostitutes and receiving payment for the arrangement.
  5. Receiving Gifts for Arranging Encounters: Accepting expensive gifts or other forms of compensation for arranging sexual encounters.
  6. Managing Escort Services: Running an escort service where service members are clients and taking a cut of the profits.
  7. Organizing Group Events: Setting up group events where multiple service members pay for the company of prostitutes and taking a share of the fees.
  8. Offering ‘VIP’ Services: Charging a premium to arrange encounters with high-end escorts and keeping a portion of the fee.
  9. Using Social Media: Advertising and arranging sexual services through social media platforms and receiving compensation.
  10. Providing Transportation: Driving service members to brothels or escort services and receiving a fee from the establishment.
  11. Facilitating Prostitution During Deployments: Arranging for local sex workers to meet service members during deployments and receiving payment.
  12. Charging Fees for Contact Information: Selling contact information of prostitutes to service members and taking a cut of their payments.
  13. Using Housing for Arrangements: Allowing prostitutes to use personal housing to meet clients and charging them a fee.
  14. Receiving a Commission from Hotels: Partnering with hotels to provide access to prostitutes and receiving a commission for each arrangement.
  15. Organizing ‘Adult’ Parties: Setting up parties where service members pay for sexual services and taking a portion of the entrance fee.
  16. Operating an Illegal Massage Parlor: Running a massage parlor that offers sexual services to service members and profiting from it.
  17. Facilitating International Prostitution: Arranging for prostitutes to travel internationally to meet service members and taking a fee.
  18. Charging for Discretion: Offering discreet arrangements for high-ranking service members in exchange for higher payments.
  19. Using False Identities: Creating fake identities to advertise and arrange sexual services for service members and receiving payment.
  20. Setting Up ‘Business Trips’: Organizing fake business trips where the primary purpose is to engage in sexual activities with prostitutes and profiting from it.
  21. Arranging Prostitution through Bars: Partnering with local bars to provide access to prostitutes for service members and receiving a commission.
  22. Providing Security for Prostitution Rings: Offering protection services for prostitution rings that cater to service members and receiving compensation.
  23. Advertising in Military Publications: Placing ads in military publications to arrange sexual services and taking a portion of the payment.
  24. Receiving Kickbacks from Local Businesses: Partnering with local businesses that provide sexual services to service members and receiving kickbacks.
  25. Setting Up ‘Tours’: Organizing guided tours where service members visit brothels or red-light districts and receiving a fee for arranging the tours.

Each of these examples involves the act of arranging for sexual services and receiving compensation, violating the standards of good order and discipline expected in the military, and thus constituting a violation of Article 134 UCMJ Pandering.

Sample cases involving Article 134 UCMJ Pandering (Receiving Compensation for Arranging for Sexual Acts) with U.S. military service members (names and details are fictitious):

Case 1: Soto Cano Air Base, Honduras Article 134 UCMJ Pandering

Case Details: Sergeant Juan Ramirez, stationed at Soto Cano Air Base in Honduras, was discovered to be arranging sexual encounters for fellow service members and receiving compensation. He had set up a network with local sex workers and was profiting by taking a percentage of the fees charged.

Repercussions and Career Impact: Ramirez was court-martialed and received a dishonorable discharge, forfeiture of all pay and allowances, and two years of confinement. The incident led to stricter oversight of off-base activities and harmed relations with local authorities. Ramirez’s military career was effectively ended, and he faced significant difficulties reintegrating into civilian life due to his criminal record.

Case 2: Yongsan Garrison, Seoul, South Korea Article 134 UCMJ Pandering

Case Details: Private First Class Emily Park, stationed at Yongsan Garrison in Seoul, was implicated in a pandering scheme. Park arranged for local escorts to meet with U.S. service members and received substantial kickbacks from the transactions. Her activities were uncovered during a broader investigation into illegal activities involving military personnel.

Repercussions and Career Impact: Park faced a court-martial and was sentenced to a bad conduct discharge, forfeiture of all pay and allowances, and one year of confinement. The scandal led to increased scrutiny and stricter enforcement of regulations regarding interactions with local civilians. Her actions severely damaged her reputation and future employment prospects.

Case 3: Marine Corps Base Camp Smedley D. Butler, Okinawa, Japan Article 134 UCMJ Pandering

Case Details: Corporal James Lee, stationed at Marine Corps Base Camp Smedley D. Butler in Okinawa, Japan, was found guilty of arranging sexual services for fellow Marines and receiving payments for his role. Lee had been operating through a network of local contacts, facilitating transactions for a fee.

Repercussions and Career Impact: Lee was court-martialed, resulting in a reduction in rank to Private, forfeiture of pay, and 18 months of confinement. He also received a dishonorable discharge. The case led to tighter restrictions on off-base activities and strained relations with the local Okinawan community. Lee’s military career ended abruptly, and he faced significant legal and personal challenges post-service.

Case 4: Kaiserslautern, Germany Article 134 UCMJ Pandering

Case Details: Staff Sergeant Michael Schultz, stationed near Kaiserslautern Air Base in Germany, was implicated in a pandering operation. Schultz had been arranging meetings between local sex workers and U.S. service members, taking a cut of the payments. His activities were exposed following an investigation into a related incident.

Repercussions and Career Impact: Schultz was court-martialed and received a dishonorable discharge, forfeiture of all pay and allowances, and 24 months of confinement. The incident led to heightened vigilance and stricter controls on interactions between service members and local civilians. Schultz’s military career ended in disgrace, and he faced long-term consequences, including difficulty finding civilian employment.

Case 5: Navy Base San Diego, California Article 134 UCMJ Pandering

Case Details: Lieutenant Sarah Thompson, stationed at Naval Base San Diego, was found guilty of organizing and receiving payments for arranging sexual encounters between naval personnel and local escorts. Thompson used her connections to facilitate these transactions and took a significant portion of the fees.

Repercussions and Career Impact: Thompson was court-martialed and sentenced to a reduction in rank, forfeiture of pay, and 18 months of confinement. She also received a dishonorable discharge. The case brought considerable embarrassment to the base and led to mandatory training on ethical conduct for all personnel. Thompson’s actions destroyed her naval career and significantly impacted her prospects.

Case 6: Seoul, South Korea Article 134 UCMJ Pandering

Case Details: Sergeant First Class John Mitchell, stationed at USAG Humphreys, South Korea, was found to be arranging sexual services for soldiers and receiving a percentage of the payments. His activities came to light during a routine audit of financial transactions.

Repercussions and Career Impact: Mitchell faced a court martial, which resulted in a dishonorable discharge, forfeiture of all pay and allowances, and two years of confinement. The case led to a crackdown on similar activities and stricter enforcement of military regulations. Mitchell’s military career was terminated, and he faced legal challenges and personal hardships following his discharge.

Each case highlights the severe consequences of violating Article 134 UCMJ Pandering, emphasizing the importance of maintaining ethical behavior and the potential repercussions on military careers and personal lives

Skip to content