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Article 93a UCMJ Prohibited Acts with an Applicant for Military Service

Facing a court-martial, UCMJ action, Administrative Separation Board, or other Adverse Administrative Action for Article 93a UCMJ Prohibited Acts with an Applicant for Military Service? Call our experienced military defense lawyers at 1-800-921-8607 for a free consultation.

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Article 93a UCMJ Prohibited Acts with an Applicant for Military Service

This offense is also known as, Article 93a UCMJ, Prohibited Activities With Recruit Or Trainee By Person In Position Of Special Trust. It incorporated two specific offenses.

  1. Article 93a UCMJ Prohibited Acts with Specially Protected Junior Member of the Armed Forces
  2. Article 93a UCMJ Prohibited Acts with an Applicant for Military Service

Note: This law applies only to Article 93a UCMJ Prohibited Acts with an Applicant for Military Service offenses allegedly committed on or after 1 January 2019.

What is Article 93a UCMJ Prohibited Acts with an Applicant for Military Service?

Article 93A Ucmj Prohibited Acts With An Applicant For Military ServiceArticle 93a of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) pertains to prohibited acts with an applicant for military service, specifically focusing on individuals in recruiting positions or those with authority over potential recruits. This article is designed to prevent abuses of power where recruiters engage in inappropriate relationships or sexual activities with applicants. The law recognizes the vulnerability of applicants and seeks to maintain the integrity and professionalism of

the recruitment process. Effective January 1, 2019, violations of Article 93a carry severe consequences, including mandatory confinement, dishonorable discharge, confinement, and reduction in rank.

Being accused of violating Article 93a UCMJ is a serious matter that can profoundly impact one’s military career and personal life. The complexities of these cases necessitate immediate legal counsel from the best military defense lawyers. These legal professionals possess an in-depth understanding of military law and are equipped to handle the unique challenges of these accusations. They ensure that the rights of the accused are protected throughout the legal process and work diligently to uncover any flaws or inconsistencies in the prosecution’s case.

What are the Elements of Article 93a UCMJ Prohibited Acts with an Applicant for Military Service?

  1. That the accused was a (commissioned) (warrant) (noncommissioned) (petty) officer;
  2. That the accused was a military recruiter; and
  3. That (state the time and place alleged), the accused engaged in prohibited sexual activity with (state the name of the alleged victim), a person the accused knew was (an applicant for military service) (a specially protected junior member of the armed forces who was enlisted under a delayed entry program).

What are the Maximum Punishments for Article 93a UCMJ Prohibited Acts with an Applicant for Military Service?

For Article 93a UCMJ Prohibited Acts with an Applicant for Military Service offenses committed between 1 Jan 2019 to 27 Dec 2023:

  • 5 Years of Confinement
  • Dishonorable Discharge, BCD, Dismissal
  • Total Forfeitures
  • Reduction to E-1
  • Collateral Consequences of a Federal Felony Conviction

For Article 93a UCMJ Prohibited Acts with an Applicant for Military Service offenses committed after 27 Dec 2023

  • Under the Sentencing Parameters, Article 93a UCMJ Prohibited Acts with an Applicant for Military Service is a Category 2 Offense
  • Mandatory confinement ranges from 1-36 months (1 month to 3 years)
  • Dishonorable Discharge, BCD, Dismissal
  • Total Forfeitures
  • Reduction to E-1
  • Collateral Consequences of a Federal Felony Conviction
  • Note: The Military Judge MAY impose a period of confinement less than the jurisdictional maximum period of confinement upon finding specific facts that warrant such a sentence. Manual for Courts-Martial, United States (2024 ed.), Appendix 12B-C

Combined UCMJ Maximum Punishment Charts

Sample Specification for Article 93a UCMJ Prohibited Acts with an Applicant for Military Service

In that Lt Col Arnold Palmster, United States Air Force Recruiting Command,  commissioned officer, while in a position of authority over Lucy Highschooler did, at the Riverside High School Gymnasium, Riverside, CA, on or about 12 August 2025, engage in a prohibited act, to wit: Requested a fully naked massage from Lucy Highschooler, whom the accused knew was an applicant to the armed forces via the Air Force ROTC Program.

Model Specification for Article 93a UCMJ Prohibited Acts with an Applicant for Military Service

In that __________ (personal jurisdiction data), a (commissioned) (warrant) (noncommissioned) (petty) officer, while in a position of authority over ________ did, (at/on board–location), on or about ______20____, engage in a prohibited act, to wit: _______________ with ____________, whom the accused knew was (an applicant to the armed forces via (__________)) (a specially protected junior enlisted member of the armed forces enlisted under a delayed entry program).

What are the Definitions for Article 93a UCMJ Prohibited Acts with an Applicant for Military Service?

“Prohibited sexual activity” means, as specified in [cite the regulation(s) prescribed by the Secretary concerned, including paragraph number], inappropriate physical intimacy, including: [describe the prohibited conduct described in the regulation(s)].

Consent is not a defense to this offense.

“Specially protected junior member of the armed forces” means:

(a) a member of the armed forces who is assigned to, or is awaiting assignment to, basic training or other initial active duty for training, including a member who is enlisted under a delayed entry program;

(b) a member of the armed forces who is a cadet, a midshipman, an officer candidate, or a student in any other officer qualification program; and

(c) a member of the armed forces in any program that, by regulation prescribed by the

Secretary concerned, is identified as a training program for initial entry career qualification.

“Applicant for military service” means a person who, under regulations prescribed by the Secretary concerned, is an applicant for original enlistment or appointment in the armed forces.

“Training leadership position” means, with respect to a specially protected junior member of the armed forces, any of the following: (a) any drill instructor position or other leadership position in a basic training program, an officer candidate school, a reserve officers’ training corps unit, a training program for entry into the armed forces, or any program that, by regulation prescribed by the Secretary concerned, is identified as a training program for initial career qualification, and (b) faculty and staff at the United States Military Academy, the United States Naval Academy, the United States Air Force Academy, and the United States Coast Guard Academy.

“Military recruiter” means a person who, under regulations prescribed by the Secretary concerned, has the primary duty to recruit persons for military service.

Article 93a UCMJ Prohibited Acts with an Applicant for Military Service Military Defense Lawyers

Accusations under Article 93a UCMJ can stem from misunderstandings or misinterpretations of interactions between recruiters and applicants. A skilled defense lawyer can meticulously analyze the circumstances of the case, gather evidence, and present a compelling defense to refute the charges. They can also negotiate with military prosecutors to seek reduced charges or alternative resolutions.

Furthermore, the stigma associated with such accusations can have long-lasting effects on the accused’s reputation and future career prospects. A robust defense is crucial not only for legal reasons but also for mitigating the social and professional fallout. The best military defense lawyers at Gonzalez & Waddington are dedicated to providing comprehensive legal support, ensuring that their clients receive fair treatment and the best possible outcome in their cases.

If you are suspected or accused of Article 93a UCMJ Prohibited Acts with an Applicant for Military Service, speak with one of our experienced military court martial lawyers to discuss your case.

Introduction to Article 93a UCMJ: Prohibited Acts with an Applicant for Military Service

Article 93a of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) addresses prohibited acts with applicants for military service. This article aims to protect individuals seeking to join the military from abuse, exploitation, and inappropriate conduct by those in positions of power. The military takes these offenses seriously to ensure the recruitment process’s integrity and maintain trust and professionalism within the ranks. This guide provides an in-depth understanding of Article 93a, including the elements of the offense, potential punishments, and the broader implications of a conviction.

Basics of Article 93a UCMJ Prohibited Acts with an Applicant for Military Service

To secure a conviction for prohibited acts with an applicant for military service under Article 93a, the prosecution must prove the following elements beyond a reasonable doubt:

  • Authority Position: The accused was in a position of authority over the applicant. This includes recruiters, instructors, and others who influence the applicant’s entry into military service.
  • Prohibited Act: The accused engaged in a prohibited act with the applicant. This can include but is not limited to, sexual conduct, coercion, harassment, or any other inappropriate behavior.
  • Intent: The accused specifically intended to commit the prohibited act, knowing it was inappropriate or against regulations.

Collateral Consequences of Article 93a UCMJ Prohibited Acts with an Applicant for Military Service Conviction

A conviction for prohibited acts with an applicant for military service under Article 93a has numerous collateral consequences, including:

  • Employment Challenges: Finding civilian employment can be extremely difficult for individuals with a dishonorable discharge and a conviction for unethical conduct. Many employers are hesitant to hire individuals with such a conviction.
  • Loss of Military Benefits: Convicted individuals typically lose all military benefits, including retirement pay, healthcare benefits, and access to military facilities.
  • Social Stigma: The social stigma attached to such a conviction can lead to isolation, harassment, and difficulties in maintaining personal relationships.
  • Legal Restrictions: Convicted individuals may face various legal restrictions, including limits on employment opportunities in certain fields, especially those involving trust and authority.

Impact on the Victim in Article 93a UCMJ Prohibited Acts with an Applicant for Military Service Case

The impact of prohibited acts on applicants can be profound and long-lasting. Victims may experience a range of emotional, psychological, and professional effects, including:

  • Emotional Trauma: Feelings of shame, guilt, and anxiety are common among victims of abuse and exploitation. These feelings can persist and affect all areas of life.
  • Psychological Issues: Victims may develop mental health conditions such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and other anxiety disorders.
  • Professional Setbacks: The experience can affect the victim’s perception of the military, potentially deterring them from pursuing a career in the armed forces.
  • Behavioral Changes: Victims may exhibit changes in behavior, such as withdrawal from social activities, difficulty in trusting authority figures, and decreased motivation.
  • Relationship Difficulties: Trust issues and difficulties in forming healthy relationships are common among survivors of abuse and exploitation.

Legal Defenses for Article 93a UCMJ Prohibited Acts with an Applicant for Military Service

Accused individuals have the right to present a defense against charges of prohibited acts with an applicant for military service. Common defenses include:

  • Consent: While consent might be argued, it is generally not a valid defense given the power dynamics involved and the specific prohibitions against such conduct.
  • Mistaken Identity: The defense may argue that the accused was not the individual who committed the offense.
  • False Accusations: The defense may present evidence suggesting that the accusations are false or motivated by ulterior motives.
  • Lack of Intent: The defense may argue that the actions were misinterpreted and not intended to be inappropriate or coercive.

Importance of Legal Representation in an Article 93a UCMJ Prohibited Acts with an Applicant for Military Service Case

Given the serious nature of the charges and the severe consequences of a conviction, it is crucial for individuals accused of prohibited acts with an applicant for military service to seek experienced legal representation. A qualified military defense attorney can provide guidance, build a strong defense, and protect the accused’s rights throughout the legal process.

Military Defense Lawyers for Article 93a UCMJ Prohibited Acts with an Applicant for Military Service

Article 93a UCMJ’s provisions on prohibited acts with an applicant for military service are designed to protect individuals seeking to join the military from abuse and exploitation and to uphold the standards of conduct required for military service. The severe penalties and collateral consequences underscore the gravity of such offenses. Understanding the elements of the offense, potential defenses, and the importance of legal representation is essential for anyone facing such charges.

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