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Military Sexual Harassment: Understanding Article 134, Defenses, and the Role of Civilian Court-Martial Lawyers UCMJ

Military Sexual Harassment Article 134: UCMJ Defenses, and the Role of Civilian Court-Martial Lawyers

Military Sexual Harassment Article 134 Defense Lawyer military defense lawyersSexual harassment has no place in the military, and the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) has clear provisions for addressing it. Article 134, often called the “General Article,” is a critical tool in the fight against sexual harassment within the armed forces. This article will explore the elements of sexual harassment under Article 134, potential defenses, and how a civilian court-martial lawyer can play a crucial role in defending against allegations.

Understanding Article 134 and Sexual Harassment

Article 134 of the UCMJ is a broad provision that addresses offenses that are prejudicial to good order and discipline or bring discredit upon the armed forces. Sexual harassment falls under this umbrella, as it directly undermines the military’s core values and cohesion.

In 2022, President Biden signed an executive order solidifying sexual harassment as a standalone offense under Article 134. This move brought clarity and strength to the military’s efforts to combat this issue.

Elements of Sexual Harassment Under Article 134

To secure a conviction under Article 134 for sexual harassment, the following elements must be proven beyond a reasonable doubt:

  1. The accused engaged in sexual harassment: This includes a wide range of behaviors, such as:

    • Unwanted sexual advances
    • Requests for sexual favors
    • Verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature
    • Explicit or sexually suggestive comments, jokes, or gestures
    • Creating a hostile work environment based on sex
  2. The conduct was unwelcome: The victim did not consent to or desire the sexual behavior.

  3. The conduct was prejudicial to good order and discipline OR service discrediting: This means the behavior undermined the military’s mission, created a hostile environment, or brought the armed forces into disrepute.

Defending Against Article 134 Sexual Harassment Allegations

If you are facing charges of sexual harassment under Article 134, several defense strategies may be available, depending on the specific circumstances of your case:

  1. The conduct was not sexual harassment: The accused may argue that their behavior did not meet the definition of sexual harassment, or that it was misinterpreted.

  2. The conduct was welcome: The accused may claim that the alleged victim participated willingly in the behavior and that it was consensual.

  3. Lack of intent: The accused may argue that they did not intend to cause harm or create a hostile environment.

  4. False accusation: The accused may claim the allegations are fabricated or motivated by malice.

The Crucial Role of Civilian Court-Martial Lawyers in Military Sexual Harassment Cases

Navigating the military justice system can be complex, especially when facing serious charges like sexual harassment. A civilian court-martial lawyer with expertise in military law can be an invaluable asset in your defense. Here’s how they can help:

  • In-depth knowledge of UCMJ: Court-martial lawyers understand the nuances of military law and can identify potential weaknesses in the prosecution’s case.
  • Investigative resources: They have access to investigators who can gather evidence, interview witnesses, and build a strong defense strategy.
  • Trial experience: Court-martial lawyers are skilled litigators who can effectively represent you and challenge the prosecution’s arguments.
  • Mitigation: Even if a conviction is unavoidable, a lawyer can work to mitigate the consequences and minimize the impact on your career and future.

When facing sexual harassment allegations under Article 134, your choice of legal representation can make a monumental difference in the outcome of your case and your future. While the military will provide you with a defense attorney, opting for a civilian court-martial lawyer specializing in military law offers distinct advantages.

Specialized Expertise

Civilian court-martial lawyers dedicate their careers to understanding the intricacies of the UCMJ and the military justice system. This focused expertise gives them an edge in identifying potential flaws in the prosecution’s case, crafting tailored defense strategies, and anticipating the tactics used by military prosecutors.

Unwavering Advocacy

Unlike military defense attorneys who are part of the military chain of command, civilian lawyers focus solely on advocating for their clients. They are not subject to potential conflicts of interest or pressure from superiors, which allows them to provide unbiased and aggressive representation without fear of reprisal.

Investigative Resources

Civilian court-martial lawyers often have access to extensive investigative resources. They can hire private investigators, forensic experts, and other professionals to gather evidence, analyze witness statements, and build a robust defense on your behalf. This can be crucial in cases where the military investigation may have been incomplete or biased.

Trial Experience

Many civilian court-martial lawyers have a wealth of experience litigating complex military cases, including those involving sexual harassment. They understand the nuances of court-martial proceedings, the rules of evidence, and the most effective strategies for cross-examining witnesses and presenting compelling arguments in your favor.

Mitigation and Negotiation

Even if the evidence against you seems overwhelming, a skilled civilian lawyer can work to negotiate a favorable plea agreement or seek alternative resolutions that may minimize the consequences. They can also focus on mitigating factors that may reduce the severity of any potential punishment.

Protecting Your Rights and Reputation

Beyond the immediate legal battle, a civilian court-martial lawyer can help you navigate the long-term implications of sexual harassment charges. They can assist with damage control, protecting your reputation, and ensuring your rights are upheld throughout the process.

Peace of Mind

Facing military sexual harassment charges can be incredibly stressful and isolating. Having a dedicated civilian lawyer by your side can provide invaluable peace of mind. They can guide you through the legal process, answer your questions, and advocate fiercely for your interests every step of the way.

Choosing Your Advocate

When selecting a civilian court-martial lawyer, it’s essential to look for someone with:

  • Proven experience: Seek a lawyer with a strong track record in military sexual harassment cases.
  • Strong reputation: Research the lawyer’s standing in the legal community and read reviews from previous clients.
  • Clear communication: Choose a lawyer who explains complex legal concepts in a way you can understand and keeps you informed throughout the process.
  • Personal connection: Select a lawyer you feel comfortable with and trust to represent you effectively.

Remember, your choice of legal representation can have a lasting impact on your life and career. Investing in a qualified civilian court-martial lawyer is crucial in protecting your future.

Sexual Harassment in the Military: A Statistical Analysis

Sexual harassment in the military remains a critical issue, deeply affecting service members’ morale and well-being. Understanding the prevalence and impact of sexual harassment is essential for developing effective prevention and response strategies. This article provides an in-depth analysis of sexual harassment in the military, supported by statistics, quotes from laws, articles, and speeches.

Prevalence and Statistics

Sexual harassment is a pervasive problem in the military. According to the RAND Corporation’s report “Organizational Characteristics Associated with Risk of Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Army,” the prevalence of sexual harassment remains alarmingly high. The report, based on extensive surveys and data analysis, provides a comprehensive view of the issue.

Key Statistics from the RAND Report:

  • High Prevalence in Certain Units: The report highlights that installations such as Fort Hood and Fort Bliss have significantly higher risks of sexual harassment. For instance, the adjusted sexual harassment risk at Fort Hood was found to be 1.7% higher than expected based on personnel characteristics (RAND Corporation, p. xii).
  • Gender Disparity: The prevalence of sexual harassment is notably higher among women than men. The 2018 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Personnel (WGRA) estimated that 24.2% of active-duty women and 6.3% of active-duty men experienced sexual harassment in the previous year (RAND Corporation, p. xi).
  • Impact on Mental Health: The RAND report also points out the significant mental health consequences of sexual harassment. Victims are at a higher risk of developing conditions such as PTSD, depression, and anxiety (RAND Corporation, p. 4).
  • Reporting and Retaliation: One of the significant barriers to addressing sexual harassment is the fear of retaliation. According to the 2018 WGRA, 64% of service members who reported sexual harassment experienced retaliation (RAND Corporation, p. xi).

Quotes from Laws and Regulations

Various laws and military regulations aim to address sexual harassment, reflecting the seriousness of the issue and the need for a robust legal framework.

  • Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ): Article 134 of the UCMJ covers a broad range of offenses, including sexual harassment. It states: “All conduct of a nature to bring discredit upon the armed forces, including acts of sexual harassment, shall be subject to punishment under this article” (RAND Corporation, p. 1).
  • Department of Defense Directive 1350.2: This directive defines sexual harassment as: “Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when submission to or rejection of such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of a person’s job, pay, or career” (RAND Corporation, p. 1).

Insights from Articles and Speeches

Numerous articles and speeches have underscored the severity of sexual harassment in the military and the need for systemic change.

  • New York Times Article: In a 2019 article, Jennifer Steinhauer discussed the challenges faced by service members in reporting sexual harassment and the culture of silence. She wrote: “Despite multiple initiatives aimed at encouraging reporting and supporting victims, many service members remain hesitant to come forward due to fear of retaliation and the potential impact on their careers” (Steinhauer, p. 2).
  • Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III’s Speech: In a speech at the Pentagon in 2020, Secretary Austin emphasized the importance of addressing sexual harassment in the military. He stated: “Sexual harassment and assault have no place in our military. We must do everything in our power to prevent these acts, support the victims, and hold perpetrators accountable. Our service members deserve a safe and respectful environment in which to serve our nation” (Austin, p. 3).

Recommendations and Prevention Strategies

The RAND report provides several recommendations to address sexual harassment effectively.

  1. Targeted Prevention Programs: Prevention programs should be targeted at bases, commands, and career fields with the highest risk. For instance, Fort Hood and Fort Bliss, which have higher-than-expected risks, should be focal points for new or supplementary prevention efforts (RAND Corporation, p. xii).
  2. Use of Survey Data: The Army could use routinely collected survey data to identify units, commands, bases, or other groups with high or rising risk of sexual harassment. Investing in developing these surveys to serve this purpose is crucial (RAND Corporation, p. xiii).
  3. Climate Improvement Interventions: Developing climate-improvement interventions for commands, bases, and career fields with high adjusted sexual harassment risk and poor climate scores is essential. These interventions should aim to improve the features of the climate assessed in the WGRA scales (RAND Corporation, p. xiii).
  4. Case Studies and Historical Risk Information: Conducting case studies of bases where adjusted sexual harassment risk has changed substantially can help identify the causes of these changes. Sharing historical risk information with unit commanders can forewarn them of persistent problems and sensitize them to the need for special prevention measures (RAND Corporation, p. xiii).

Summary of Findings

Sexual harassment in the military is a pervasive issue with significant implications for the well-being of service members and the integrity of the armed forces. Despite various initiatives, the prevalence remains high, with substantial gender disparities and severe mental health impacts. Effective prevention and response strategies require a multifaceted approach, including targeted programs, improved reporting mechanisms, and ongoing climate improvement efforts. By addressing these issues comprehensively, the military can create a safer and more respectful environment for all service members, ultimately enhancing the effectiveness and cohesion of the armed forces.

Consequences of a Military Sexual Harassment Conviction

A conviction for sexual harassment under Article 134 can have severe consequences, including:

  • Jail time: Potential for imprisonment, depending on the severity of the offense.
  • Dishonorable discharge: This can lead to the loss of benefits and future employment opportunities.
  • Reduction in rank: This can result in lower pay and status.
  • Financial penalties: May include fines and loss of pay.

Absolutely! Here’s a deeper look into the consequences of a military sexual harassment conviction and the crucial role legal representation plays in mitigating them:

A Military Sexual Harassment Conviction Can be Life-Altering

A conviction for sexual harassment under Article 134 of the UCMJ can have devastating and far-reaching consequences that extend well beyond the military:

  1. Incarceration: Depending on the severity of the offense, a conviction can result in significant jail time. This disrupts your life and can lead to long-term challenges in finding employment and reintegrating into society.

  2. Punitive Discharge: A conviction often leads to a dishonorable or bad conduct discharge. This permanent stain on your record can severely limit your career prospects and bar you from receiving veteran benefits, including healthcare, education, and housing assistance.

  3. Loss of Rank and Pay: A reduction in rank can result in decreased pay and loss of status within the military community. This can have lasting financial repercussions and impact your ability to provide for your family.

  4. Financial Penalties: You may face significant fines and restitution payments to the victim, further straining your finances.

  5. Sex Offender Registration: In some cases, a conviction may require registration as a sex offender, further limiting your housing options and employment opportunities.

  6. Social Stigma: A sexual harassment conviction carries a heavy social stigma, impacting your relationships, reputation, and overall well-being. This can lead to isolation, depression, and other mental health issues.

The Importance of Legal Representation: Your Lifeline in a Crisis

Given the severity of these consequences, having skilled legal representation is not just a luxury but a necessity. A civilian court-martial lawyer can be your lifeline in navigating the complexities of the military justice system and protecting your rights and future.

  • Building a Strong Defense: An experienced lawyer can meticulously analyze the evidence, identify weaknesses in the prosecution’s case, and develop a robust defense strategy tailored to your specific circumstances. They can also leverage their investigative resources to gather additional evidence that could exonerate you.

  • Mitigating the Consequences: Even if a conviction is unavoidable, a skilled lawyer can work tirelessly to mitigate the punishment. They can present mitigating factors, such as a lack of prior offenses or evidence of good character, to argue for a lighter sentence. They can also negotiate plea deals that reduce charges or associated penalties.

  • Protecting Your Rights: Military sexual harassment cases can be fraught with procedural complexities and potential violations of your rights. A knowledgeable lawyer can ensure that your due process rights are protected, that evidence is collected legally, and that you are treated fairly throughout the legal process.

  • Advocating for Your Future: Beyond the immediate legal battle, a civilian court-martial lawyer can help you navigate the aftermath of a conviction. They can guide you through the appeals process, assist with reintegration into civilian life, and help you access the necessary resources to rebuild your life.

Seeking Legal Help: A Critical Decision

If you are facing charges of sexual harassment in the military, seeking the counsel of a qualified civilian court-martial lawyer should be your top priority. Their expertise, dedication, and advocacy can make all the difference in protecting your rights, reputation, and future.

Remember, you are not alone in this fight. A skilled lawyer can be your strongest ally in navigating the complexities of the military justice system and securing the best possible outcome for your case. Don’t hesitate to seek legal help—your future depends on it.

Protecting Your Future

If you are facing allegations of sexual harassment in the military, seeking the assistance of a qualified civilian court-martial lawyer is essential. They can provide the expertise, guidance, and advocacy you need to protect your rights, career, and freedom.

Remember, a strong defense can make a significant difference in the outcome of your case. Don’t hesitate to seek legal help if you find yourself in this challenging situation.

 

Overview of the Rand Report

Sexual harassment in the military continues to be a significant issue affecting service members’ morale and effectiveness. The RAND Corporation’s report, “Organizational Characteristics Associated with Risk of Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Army,” offers a detailed examination of the factors contributing to this pervasive problem. This article synthesizes key findings, statistics, and recommendations from the report, providing a comprehensive overview of the current state of sexual harassment in the military.

Prevalence and Statistics

High Prevalence in Certain Units

The RAND report highlights that certain military installations, such as Fort Hood and Fort Bliss, have significantly higher risks of sexual harassment. Specifically, the adjusted sexual harassment risk at Fort Hood was found to be 1.7% higher than expected based on the characteristics of personnel assigned there (RAND Corporation, p. xii). This indicates that organizational and environmental factors at these installations contribute to the heightened risk.

Gender Disparity

Sexual harassment disproportionately affects women in the military. The 2018 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Personnel (WGRA) estimated that 24.2% of active-duty women and 6.3% of active-duty men experienced sexual harassment in the previous year (RAND Corporation, p. xi). This stark gender disparity underscores the need for targeted interventions to protect female service members.

Mental Health Impact

The report also highlights the significant mental health consequences of sexual harassment. Victims of sexual harassment are at a higher risk of developing conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and anxiety (RAND Corporation, p. 4). These mental health issues not only affect the well-being of individual service members but also impact overall military readiness and effectiveness.

Reporting and Retaliation

Fear of retaliation remains a significant barrier to reporting sexual harassment. The 2018 WGRA found that 64% of service members who reported sexual harassment experienced some form of retaliation (RAND Corporation, p. xi). This statistic highlights the need for robust protections for those who come forward with allegations of harassment.

Legal Framework

Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ)

The UCMJ provides the legal framework for addressing sexual harassment in the military. Article 134 of the UCMJ states: “All conduct of a nature to bring discredit upon the armed forces, including acts of sexual harassment, shall be subject to punishment under this article” (RAND Corporation, p. 1). This broad provision underscores the military’s commitment to maintaining a professional and respectful environment.

Department of Defense Directive 1350.2

Department of Defense Directive 1350.2 defines sexual harassment as: “Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when submission to or rejection of such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of a person’s job, pay, or career” (RAND Corporation, p. 1). This definition highlights the various forms that sexual harassment can take and the serious implications it has for victims’ careers.

Insights from Articles and Speeches

New York Times Article

A 2019 article by Jennifer Steinhauer in the New York Times discussed the challenges faced by service members in reporting sexual harassment. Steinhauer noted: “Despite multiple initiatives aimed at encouraging reporting and supporting victims, many service members remain hesitant to come forward due to fear of retaliation and the potential impact on their careers” (Steinhauer, p. 2). This commentary underscores the ongoing cultural challenges within the military.

Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III’s Speech

In a 2020 speech at the Pentagon, Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III emphasized the importance of addressing sexual harassment: “Sexual harassment and assault have no place in our military. We must do everything in our power to prevent these acts, support the victims, and hold perpetrators accountable. Our service members deserve a safe and respectful environment in which to serve our nation” (Austin, p. 3). Austin’s remarks reflect a top-down commitment to tackling this issue.

Recommendations and Prevention Strategies

Targeted Prevention Programs

The RAND report recommends that new or supplementary prevention programs be targeted at bases, commands, and career fields with the highest risk. For example, Fort Hood and Fort Bliss should be focal points for these initiatives due to their higher-than-expected risks (RAND Corporation, p. xii).

Use of Survey Data

To identify units, commands, bases, or other groups with high or rising risk of sexual harassment, the Army could use routinely collected survey data from sources like the Defense Equal Opportunity Employment Survey. Developing these surveys to serve this purpose is crucial (RAND Corporation, p. xiii).

Climate Improvement Interventions

The Army should develop climate-improvement interventions for commands, bases, and career fields with high adjusted sexual harassment risk and poor climate scores. These interventions should aim to improve the features of the climate assessed in the WGRA scales (RAND Corporation, p. xiii).

Case Studies and Historical Risk Information

Conducting case studies of bases where adjusted sexual harassment risk has changed substantially can help identify the causes of these changes. Sharing historical risk information with unit commanders can forewarn them of persistent problems and sensitize them to the need for special prevention measures (RAND Corporation, p. xiii).

Conclusion

Sexual harassment in the military remains a pervasive issue with significant implications for the well-being of service members and the effectiveness of military operations. Despite various initiatives and legal frameworks, the prevalence of sexual harassment remains high, with substantial gender disparities and severe mental health impacts. Effective prevention and response strategies require a multifaceted approach, including targeted programs, improved reporting mechanisms, and ongoing climate improvement efforts. By addressing these issues comprehensively, the military can create a safer and more respectful environment for all service members, ultimately enhancing the effectiveness and cohesion of the armed forces.

For more detailed information, you can refer to the full RAND report: Organizational Characteristics Associated with Risk of Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Army.

Our Military Defense Lawyers Defend UCMJ Cases at the Following Military Bases in the United States, Europe, & Asia

Maxwell Gunter Air Force Base, Montgomery, AL
Redstone Arsenal Army Post, Madison, AL
Fort Novosel Army Post, Dale, AL

USCG Juneau Coast Guard Base, Juneau, AK
Marine Safety Unit Valdez Coast Guard Base, Valdez, AK
ISC Kodiak Coast Guard Base, Kodiak Island, AK
Fort Greely Army Post, Fairbanks, AK
Elmendorf Air Force Base, Anchorage, AK
Eielson Air Force Base, North Pole, AK
Fort Wainwright Army Post, Fairbanks, AK
Fort Richardson Army Post, Anchorage, AK

MCAS Yuma Marine Corps Base, Yuma, AZ
Davis Monthan Air Force Base, Tucson, AZ
Luke Air Force Base, Glendale, AZ
Fort Huachuca Army Post, Cochise, AZ

Fort Chaffee Army Post, Fort Smith, AR
Pine Bluff Arsenal Army Post, Jefferson County, AR
Little Rock Air Force Base, Jacksonville, AR

Petaluma Coast Guard Base, Petaluma, CA
ISC Alameda Coast Guard Base, Alameda, CA
NWS Seal Beach Navy Base, Seal Beach, CA
Naval Postgraduate School Navy Base, Monterey, CA
Naval Air Facility Navy Base, El Centro, CA
NS San Diego Navy Base, San Diego, CA
NAS Point Mugu Navy Base, Poing Mugu, CA
Point Loma Navy Base, San Diego, CA
NAS Lemoore Navy Base, Lemoore, CA
Naval Base Coronado Navy Base, San Diego, CA
NAWS China Lake Navy Base, China Lake, CA
Twentynine Palms Marine Corps BAse, Twentynine Palms, CA
MCRD San Diego Marine Corps Base, San Diego, CA
MCAS Miramar Marine Corps Base, San Diego, CA
Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base, San Diego, CA
MCLB Barstow Marine Corps Base, Barstow, CA
Vandenberg Air Force Base, Lompoc, CA
Travis Air Force Base, Fairfield, CA
Los Angeles Air Force Base, El Segundo, CA
Edwards Air Force Base, Edwards, CA
Beale Air Force Base, Marysville, CA
Presidio Of Monterey Army Post, Monterey, CA
Fort Irwin Army Post, Barstow, CA

Schriever Air Force Base, El Paso, CO
Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado Springs, CO
Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Base, Colorado Springs, CO
Buckley Air Force Base, Aurora, CO
Air Force Academy (USAFA), Colorado Springs, CO
Fort Carson Army Post, Colorado Springs, CO

US Coast Guard Academy (USCGA), New London, CT
Marine Safety Center Marine Base, Groton, CT
Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton, CT

Dover Air Force Base, Dover, DE

Naval Research Laboratory Navy Base, Washington, DC
Coast Guard Headquarters, Washington, DC
Navy Yard Navy Base, Washington DC
The Pentagon, Washington, DC
Marine Barracks Marine Corps Base, Washington, DC
Bolling Air Force Base, Washington, DC
Walter Reed Medical Center, Washington, DC
Fort McNair Army Post, Washington, DC

Homestead Air Reserve Base, Miami, FL
District 7 Coast Guard Base, Miami, FL
Air Station Clearwater Coast Guard Base, Clearwater, FL
Blount Island Command Marine Corps, Jacksonville, FL
NAS Panama City Navy Base, Panama City, FL
Naval Air Warfare Center Navy Base, Orlando, FL
NAS Whiting Field Navy Base, Milton, FL
NAS Pensacola Navy Base, Pensacola, FL
NS Mayport Navy Base, Duval, FL
NAS Key West Navy Base, Key West, FL
NAS Jacksonville Navy Base, Jacksonville, FL
Training Center Corry Navy Base, Pensacola, FL
MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa, FL
Tyndall Air Force Base, Panama City, FL
Patrick Air Force Base, Brevard, FL
Hurlburt Field Air Force Base, Mary Esther, FL
Eglin Air Force Base, Valparaiso, FL

Kings Bay Submarine Navy Base, Kings Bay, GA
NAS Atlanta Navy Base, Marietta, GA
MCLB Albany Army Post, Albany, GA
Robins Air Force Base, Houston, GA
Moody Air Force Base, Valdosta, GA
Hunter Army Airfield Army Post, Savannah, GA
Fort Stewart Army Post, Liberty, GA
Fort McPherson Army Post, East Point, GA
Fort Eisenhower Army Post, Augusta, GA
Fort Gillem Army Post, Forest Park, GA
Fort Moore Army Post, Columbus, GA

Wheeler Army Airfield Base, Wahiawa, Hawaii
USCG ISC Honolulu Coast Guard Base, Honolulu, HI
Station Maui Coast Guard Base, Wailuku, HI
NS Pearl Harbor Navy Base, Oahu, HI
NCTAMS PAC Navy Base, Wahiawa, HI
MCB Hawaii Marine Corps Base, Kaneohe, HI
Hickam Air Force Base, Honolulu, HI
Tripler Medical Center Army Post, Honolulu, HI
Schofield Barracks Army Post, Oahu, HI
Fort Shafter Army Post, Honolulu, HI

Mountain Home Air Force Base, Elmore, ID

Rock Island Arsenal Army Post, Arsenal Island, IL
Great Lakes Training Center Navy Base, Chicago, IL
Scott Air Force Base, St Clair, IL

United States Disciplinary Barracks, Fort Leavenworth, KS
McConnell Air Force Base, Sedgwick, KS
Fort Riley Army Post, Riley, KS
Fort Leavenworth Army Post, Leavenworth, KS

Fort Knox Army Post, Elizabethtown, KY
Fort Campbell Army Post, Clarksville, TN

Marine Corps Support Facility, New Orleans, LA
NSA New Orleans Navy Base, New Orleans, LA
Barksdale Air Force Base, Bossier City, LA
Fort Johnson Army Post, Vernon Parish, LA

NS Portsmouth Navy Base, Portsmouth, ME
NAS Brunswick Navy Base, Brunswick, ME

Coast Guard Yard, Baltimore, MD
NSA Annapolis Navy Base, Annapolis, MD
NAS Patuxent River Navy Base, Lexington Park, MD
Naval Medical Center Navy Base, Bethesda, MD
US Naval Academy (USNA), Annapolis, MD
Andrews Air Force Base, MD
Fort Meade Army Post, Odenton, MD
Fort Detrick Army Post, Frederick, MD
Aberdeen Proving Ground Army Post, Aberdeen, MD

Sector SE New England Coast Guard, Woods Hole, MA
Air Station Cape Cod Coast Guard Base, Cape Cod, MA
Hanscom Air Force Base, Bedford, MA

Camp Shelby Army Post, Hattiesburg, MS
NS Pascagoula Navy Base, Pascagoula, MS
NAS Meridian Navy Base, Meridian, MS
Keesler Air Force Base, Biloxi, MS
Gulfport Battalion Center Navy Base, Gulfport, MS

Whiteman Air Force Base, Johnson, MO
Fort Leonard Wood Army Post,Fort Leonard Wood, MO

Malmstrom Air Force Base, Cascade, MT

Offutt Air Force Base, Bellevue, NE

Creech Air Force Base, Indian Springs, NV
NAS Fallon Navy Base, Fallon, NV
Nellis Air Force Base, Las Vegas, NV

Portsmouth Shipyard Navy Base, Portsmouth, NH

NAES Lakehurst Navy Base, Lakehurst, NJ
Mcguire Air Force Base, New Hanover, NJ
Fort Dix Army Post, Burlington, NJ

Los Alamos Demolition Army Post, North Central, NM
Kirtland Air Force Base, Bernalillo, NM
Holloman Air Force Base, Otero, NM
Cannon Air Force Base, Curry, NM
White Sands Missile Range Army Post, Otero, NM

US Military Academy (USMA), West Point, NY
Fort Hamilton Army Post, Brooklyn, NY
Fort Drum Army Post, Jefferson, NY

Simmons Army Airfield, Cumberland, NC
Military Ocean Terminal Sunny Point, Brunswick County, NC
Camp Mackall Army Post, Southern Pines, NC
Air Station Elizabeth City Coast Guard Base, Elizabeth City, NC
MCAS New River Marine Corps Base, Jacksonville, NC
MCAS Cherry Point Marine Corps Base, Havelock, NC
Camp Lejeune Marine Corps Base, Jacksonville NC
Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, Goldsboro, NC
Pope Air Force Base, Fayetteville, NC
Fort Liberty Army Post, Fayetteville, NC

Minot Air Force Base, Minot, ND
Grand Forks Air Force Base, Grand Forks, ND

ISC Cleveland Coast Guard Base, Cleveland, OH
Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, OH

Coast Guard Institute, Oklahoma City, OK
Vance Air Force Base, Enid, OK
Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma City, OK
Altus Air Force Base, Altus, OK
Fort Sill Army Post, Lawton, OK

Naval Support Activity, Philadelphia, PA
JRB Willow Grove Navy Base, Willow Grove, PA
Carlisle Barracks Army Post, Carlisle, PA

Fort Buchanan, San Juan, PR
Coast Guard Base San Juan, San Juan, PR

Station Point Judith USCG, Narragansett, RI
Station Castle Hill Coast Guard, Newport, RI
NS Newport Naval Base, Newport, RI

NWS Charleston Navy Base, Goose Creek, SC
Naval Hospital Charleston Navy Base, North Charleston, SC
Naval Hospital Beaufort Navy Base, Beaufort, SC
MCRD Parris Island Marine Corps Base, Port Royal, SC
MCAS Beaufort Marine Corps Base, Beaufort, SC
Shaw Air Force Base, Sumter, SC
Joint Base Charleston Air Force North, Charleston, SC
Fort Jackson Army Post, Columbia, SC
NSA Capodichino
Gricignano Support Site
NSA Naples
NSA Gaeta
NAS Sigonella
Augusta Bay Port Facility
NCTS Naples

Ellsworth Air Force Base, Rapid City, SD

Arnold Air Force Base, Tullahoma, TN
NSA Mid South Naval Base, Millington, TN

Biggs Army Air Field at Fort Bliss, El Paso, TX
NAS Kingsville Navy Base, Kingsville, TX
NAS Corpus Christi Navy Base, Flour Bluff, TX
Sheppard Air Force Base, Wichita Falls, TX
Randolph Air Force Base, Universal City, TX
Laughlin Air Force Base, Del Rio, TX
Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, TX
Goodfellow Air Force Base, San Angelo, TX
Dyess Air Force Base, Abilene, TX
Brooks City Air Force Base, San Antonio, TX
Fort Sam Houston Army Post, San Antonio, TX
Fort Cavazos Army Post, Killeen, TX
Fort Bliss Army Post, El Paso, TX

Tooele Army Depot Base, Tooele, UT
Dugway Proving Ground Army Post, Tooele County, UT
Hill Air Force Base, Salt Lake City, UT

Naval Support Activity, Hampton Roads, VA
Training Center Yorktown Coast Guard Base, Yorktown, VA
Sector Hampton Roads Coast Guard Base, Portsmouth, VA
NSA Norfolk Navy Base, Norfolk, VA
Medical Center Portsmouth Navy Base, Portsmouth, VA
Joint Expeditionary Fort Story Naval Base, Little Creek, VA
NWS Yorktown Navy Base, Yorktown, VA
NAS Oceana Naval Base, Virginia Beach, VA
NS Norfolk Naval Base, Norfolk, VA
NSWC Dahlgren Naval Base, Dahlgren, VA
NAB Little Creek Navy Base, Norfolk, VA
Quantico Military Reservation Marine Corps, Quantico, VA
Henderson Hall Marine Corps Base, Arlington, VA
Langley Air Force Base, Hampton, VA
Fort Myer Army Post, Arlington, VA
Fort Monroe Army Post, Hampton, VA
Fort Gregg-Adams Army Post, Prince George, VA
Fort Eustis Army Post, Newport News, VA
Fort Belvoir Army Post, Fairfax, VA

Yakima Training Center Army Post, Yakima, WA
Naval Hospital Bremerton Naval Base, Bremerton, WA
NAS Whidbey Island Navy Base, Oak Harbor, WA
NS Everett Navy Base, Everett, WA
Navy Base Kitsap Navy Base, Silverdale, WA
McChord Air Force Base, Tacoma, WA
Fairchild Air Force Base, Spokane, WA
Fort Lewis Army Post, Pierce, WA

Fort McCoy Army Post, Tomah, WI

Francis E Warren Air Force Base, Cheyenne, WY

Asia - Pacific Europe South Korea Japan

Chievres Air Base, Belgium
Kleine Brogel Air Base, Belgium

USAG Grafenwoehr, Germany
USAG Ansbach, Germany
USAG Baumholder, Germany
USAG Garmisch, Germany
USAG Hohenfels, Germany
USAG Kaiserslautern, Germany
USAG Stuttgart, Germany
USAG Vilseck, Germany
USAG Wiesbaden, Germany
Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, Germany
Büchel Air Base, Germany
NATO Air Base Geilenkirchen, Germany
Ramstein Air Base, Germany
Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany

RAF Alconbury, Cambridgeshire, UK
RAF Croughton, Northamptonshire, UK
RAF Fairford, Gloucestershire, UK
RAF Feltwell, Norfolk, UK
RAF Fylingdales, North York Moors, UK
RAF Lakenheath, United Kingdom
RAF Menwith Hill, North Yorkshire, UK
RAF Mildenhall, Suffolk, UK
RAF Molesworth, Cambridgeshire, UK
RAF Welford, Berkshire, UK

NSA Souda Bay, Greece

Papa Air Base, Hungary

Naval Air Station Keflavík, Iceland

USAG Vicenza, Italy
Camp Darby, Italy
Caserma Ederle, Italy
NSA Capodichino
Gricignano Support Site
NSA Naples, Italy
NSA Gaeta, Italy
NAS Sigonella, Italy
NCTS Naples, Italy
Aviano Air Base, Italy
Ghedi Air Base, Italy
Sigonella Naval Air Station, Italy

Volkel Air Base, Netherlands

Stavanger Air Station, Norway

U.S. Army Garrison, Poland
Camp Kosciuszko, Poland
33rd Air Base, Powidz, Poland
Naval Support Facility Redzikowo, Poland
Łask Air Base, Poland

Lajes Field, Terceira Island, Azores, Portugal

Naval Support Facility Deveselu, Romania
Mihail Kogălniceanu Air Base, Romania
Câmpia Turzii Air Base, Romania

Naval Station Rota Spain, Spain
Morón Air Base, Spain

Ankara Support Facility, Turkey
Incirlik Air Base, Turkey
Izmir Air Station, Turkey

USAG Japan, Camp Zama
USAG Torii Station, Okinawa, Japan
NAF Atsugi, Japan
NSF Kamiseya, Japan
NAF Misawa, Japan
CFA Okinawa, Japan
CFA Sasebo, Sasebo, Japan
CFA Yokosuka, Yokosuka
Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan
Misawa Air Base, Japan
Yokota Air Base, Japan
Marine Corps Base Camp Smedley D. Butler, Okinawa, Japan
Camp McTureous, Okinawa, Japan
Camp Courtney, Okinawa, Japan
Camp Foster, Okinawa, Japan
Camp Fuji, Japan
Camp Gonsalves, Okinawa, Japan
Camp Schwab, Okinawa, Japan
United States Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan
Marine Corps Air Station Futenma, Japan
Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan
Misawa Air Base, Japan
Naval Air Facility Atsugi, Japan
Camp Kinser, Japan
US Fleet Activities Saesebo, Japan
Yokota Air Base, Japan
Yontan Airfield, Japan

Camp Humphreys, South Korea
Yongsan,  SouthKorea (Seoul, Korea)
USAG Yongsan, South Korea
Camp Casey, South Korea
Camp Red Cloud, Korea
Kunsan Air Base, South Korea
Osan Air Base, South Korea

 
 
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